Redundancy

Why Should Sexual Orientation Matter?

Your sexual orientation can prove a barrier to getting back into work, even though it shouldn’t, if you have a narrow-minded potential boss for an interviewer. At the end of the day, if they cannot accept your sexuality in an interview, you are going to have more problems down the line and that speaks volumes for the type of ship they will run. Yes, it’s true you don’t have to mention your sexuality in an interview, and I am not saying you should, but you can’t hide it forever – What happens when you are seen in town together with your ‘partner’, or you get asked to bring your ‘partner’ along to the Christmas party. And although you can’t be asked about your orientation as an interview question, you usually have to fill in an equal opportunities monitoring form. If this is done and handed it at the interview stage, and they know your orientation without asking it, they may use subtle questions to ask you about it or it may go against you, so just be mindful of this. I was once asked in an interview if I liked to go out with the girls from work clubbing – this should never have been asked in an interview. At that time I didn’t, and surprise, surprise, I didn’t get that job for a retail assistant at a young women’s clothing fashion brand, which eventually closed down. The girls in the shop, clearly wanted me to say I would go clubbing with them. Now, I do like going clubbing sometimes, but it’s not the point!

This week from 19th-25th of October, is Asexual Awareness Week. Become educated about Asexuality Awareness with my new Asexualise My Asexual Life YouTube channel

“For far too long many Asexuals have been living in fear of coming out about their sexuality, due to society’s pressures to conform to a majority sexual population. That’s all about to change!”

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What’s Holding You Back? – Skills and Experience

Hi Everyone

Now that we have settled into the new year, you will probably have noticed a lot of posts about goal setting and how you need to take action in order to move forward with your life. These posts are an invaluable source of information and inspiration and they are absolutely right, if you want to achieve your desired outcome, you need to take the steps to get there by setting goals and then acting on them but in the next few posts I want us to take a look at what may be holding you back from setting goals in the first place.

Sometimes in order for you to move forward you must reflect on the past and assess the present to see what changes need to be made. If you keep doing the same thing then you will always get the same result. If you are not happy with the result then you need to change what you are doing and there is no time like the present, so what are you waiting for?

Let’s consider some of the things that may be holding you back.

Not having the right skills or experience

There is no easy way to say this, if you haven’t got the right skills and experience for the job role that you desire, in these difficult economic times, you need to either obtain them or learn to convert previous experience and learnt skills into transferable experience and skills and if you can’t do that then you probably won’t get a look in because the competition is so tough.

Do not be fooled by a job advert that states: “Previous experience is not essential as full training will be given for the right candidate.”

If the interviewer can get a person with previous experience who has the correct basic skills, the right attitude for the job and is the right fit for the team, then they will go with them instead of someone with little or no experience. When I was a retail manager I recruited my own staff  and I advertised for the experience and skills that I required and yes I still got applicants applying with little or no relevant experience and as time is money in business, usually I would sift theses applications out on first look as I had a large number of applicants. Of the applicants that were sifted out there may have been some that had the right attitude or were a good fit for the team but because I didn’t put them through to the interview stage I would never know this, so having the right skills and experience is essential.

When I wasn’t working, on the odd occasion I would apply for a job that was out of my sector and one that I had little or no relevant skills or experience in, just as I thought, I would get a reject letter or worse, nothing at all. Upon analysis, the reason I got a rejection letter was because I appeared on paper to have some of the skills and experience that were relative to the job and some transferable skills but obviously not as good a offering as someone who blatantly had the skills and experience in that sector and therefore I wasn’t surprised I was rejected and took it on the chin. When I received no reply whatsoever, it was because on paper there were barely any skills and experience relevant to the role for which I had applied, so why should the employer bother to reply to me when it looked like I had randomly decided to ‘give it a go’. An employer wouldn’t like this attitude and to be honest neither do I and when I became a manager I understood that and if I were to apply for a job now I would always tailor my CV and Cover Letter to the Job specification and that’s why I get responses when a lot of other people don’t, so if you are struggling to get responses, now you know the secret, why not try it for yourself?

If you want to gain the skills and experience to get a job you desire, you need to do voluntary work, work experience and you may need to take a course as well.

To read about what else may be holding you back be sure to read the next post, until then, whatever you do, stay positive.

Sandra Bellamy

beat redundancy blues, beatredundancyblues, blog, books, C.V., cover letter, employment, interviews, job, jobs, mental health, redundancies, Redundancy, stress, unemployed, unemployment, wellbeing, writer, writing

C is for Confidence A-Z of Redundancy

Hi Everyone

It’s important whilst redundant, that when applying for jobs and going for interviews, you come across as a confident person.

Confident in:

  • Yourself
  • Your character
  • Your previous job roles
  • Your skills
  • Your experience
  • Your abilities

In interviews, you need to ensure you are displaying open and positive body language:

  • No crossed arms
  • No fists made
  • No stern looks
  • No leering

You should:

  • Smile – Creates warmth and approachability
  • Have arms by your side or on your lap with palms facing upwards – Shows openness and friendliness
  • Try to relax as much as possible – Will put the interviewer at ease

When you try to relax, pay close attention to your facial muscles, are they stiff and tight or at ease? What are your shoulders doing, are they hunched over or upright? You need to be constantly thinking about being calm and a good way to feel calm is to picture a time when you felt relaxed, maybe talking to a friend, then think of how your body felt at that moment and try to replicate it. This is hard but with practice can feel more natural and help you to get the job. If you are calm, this should make your interviewer feel calm and therefore you will appeal to them.

Remember when you speak, you are talking to a potential boss, so don’t feel so relaxed that you start talking to your  prospective employer like he is your mate in the pub as this would not be well accepted and you are not likely to get the job.

In interviews:

  • Maintain eye-contact but without staring – This can take several practices before getting it right

You have to be confident that your character (personality) will fit the job. For example, if you are a quiet person and don’t like being in crowds, then working in a pub would most likely not suit your personality. If you are a bubbly and chatty person and that’s what the job requires, you need to be confident enough to show this at your interview.

You need to be confident when talking about your previous job roles. Talk up your achievements and don’t mention negatives. If the interviewer asks you questions like – “What was your biggest obstacle in your last role and how did you overcome it?” Then you need to be honest from the employer’s perspective but change the negatives into a positive. For example, if you had a customer who was unhappy with the shoes they had bought but it was more about the comfort of the shoes rather than a manufacturing fault and company policy was not to refund just on a comfort issue as you can’t resell the shoes and the company loses money. You could say that in order to maintain good relations, you decided to exchange the shoes as a gesture of good will. You need to always add a positive outcome – The customer was happy and became a weekly regular.

Whenever you talk about your skills, experience and abilities. You need to talk about them in a positive manner with the interviewer and give examples of when you have used them in your past job roles to good effect and created a positive impact on the businesses you were working for. Then go on to say how you could use those in your new role for which you are being interviewed.

Always remember, if you are confident that you can do the job, then the prospective employer will be confident that you are suitable to work for them.

Stay positive

Sandra

beatredundancyblues, C.V., cover letter, employment, finance, health, housing benefit, interviews, job search, new website, redundancies, Redundancy, unemployed, unemployment, wellbeing

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Thank you.  Stay positive.  Sandra Bellamy